Reciprocity

We’re hardwired to return kindness received

Considered the most powerful global social rule, our initial actions can be highly persuasive in affecting others’ judgements and decisions thereafter.

Jacob, C., Guéguen, N., & Boulbry, G. (2015). Effect of an unexpected small favor on compliance with a survey request. Journal of Business Research, 68, 56–59.

The study

Setup

407 pedestrians in Brittany, France were approached by a young woman and asked to complete a survey. Before the request, half were offered candy and the other half were not.

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Results

The results found that people - especially women - were far more likely to reciprocate and answer the survey after receiving a gift than when not.

np_read_2490885_000000

In detail

Key Takeaways

Act first. Find ways to initiate reciprocity with consumers.  Merely asking those satisfied to go tell their friends will work (Söderlund et al., 2015).

Make it a ‘common habit’. When we’re told that a behavior is a social norm shared by others, we’re more likely to reciprocate. Households in USA and India consume significantly less electricity when told that their neighbors are consuming less (Sudarshan, 2014). In the long-term, any consistent, successful behaviors will be adopted as the default for others.

Do it in person. Reciprocation appears to be more powerful when requests from strangers are made face to face rather than online. This is due to the persuasive impact of immediacy that physicality affords, the higher levels of digital suspicion and the sheer number of emails people receive (Meier, 2016).

Reciprocity

We’re hardwired to return kindness received

Considered the most powerful global social rule, our initial actions can be highly persuasive in affecting others’ judgements and decisions thereafter.

Jacob, C., Guéguen, N., & Boulbry, G. (2015). Effect of an unexpected small favor on compliance with a survey request. Journal of Business Research, 68, 56–59.

The study

Setup

407 pedestrians in Brittany, France were approached by a young woman and asked to complete a survey. Before the request, half were offered candy and the other half were not.

Results

The results found that people - especially women - were far more likely to reciprocate and answer the survey after receiving a gift than when not.

Key Takeaways

Act first. Find ways to initiate reciprocity with consumers.  Merely asking those satisfied to go tell their friends will work (Söderlund et al., 2015).

Make it a ‘common habit’. When we’re told that a behavior is a social norm shared by others, we’re more likely to reciprocate. Households in USA and India consume significantly less electricity when told that their neighbors are consuming less (Sudarshan, 2014). In the long-term, any consistent, successful behaviors will be adopted as the default for others.

Do it in person. Reciprocation appears to be more powerful when requests from strangers are made face to face rather than online. This is due to the persuasive impact of immediacy that physicality affords, the higher levels of digital suspicion and the sheer number of emails people receive (Meier, 2016).

Reciprocity

We’re hardwired to return kindness received

Considered the most powerful global social rule, our initial actions can be highly persuasive in affecting others’ judgements and decisions thereafter.

The study

Setup

407 pedestrians in Brittany, France were approached by a young woman and asked to complete a survey. Before the request, half were offered candy and the other half were not.

Results

The results found that people - especially women - were far more likely to reciprocate and answer the survey after receiving a gift than when not.

np_read_2490885_000000

In detail

Pairings

Experience

Provide opportunities to add the giver into the gift

Gifts are such personal gestures, but they could bring us even closer, by allowing the giver to express themselves more and become a larger part of the gift itself.

Currently, when we send gifts, we can sometimes create a personal note, but beyond that, there is little we can do.

High quality product companies should allow the giver more creative control of the gift, allowing them to choose from a variety of packaging options, scents, colours or custom-printed features that allow the giver to be better-represented within the gift, making them truly unique each time.

Digital product companies needn't lose out - offering the ability to let gift-givers record surprise audio or video messages that are unlocked by the receiver when they click the button in the email.

Gifts should celebrate the bond between two people, so we should design experiences that unlock and explore this natural yet powerful desire to connect, physically or digitally.

Loyalty

Make memories social to trigger a desire for new ones

Positive memories are rarely experienced in isolation. Instead, we tend to reminisce together about the past. If you're using nostalgia in your communications, frame messages as a reciprocal question to others, like "Do you remember this too?". Airlines, holiday and events firms or any experiential companies can use this.

What shared past experiences can you surface to start a reciprocal journey down memory lane? Next: make it easy to make brand new memories together.

Conversion

Allow existing customers to get new customers started

Getting people started is often the hardest thing. However, those who've already made investments in a platform or service can act as a means to help new subscribers get started. For example, someone on a weekly coffee subscription could share a code with a friend to simply try the service for free for a week.

This could be taken further by allowing the existing subscriber to add a personalised note or make a product choice they think would be best for the new subscriber.

How can you use the wisdom of more experienced users to get the uninformed started?

Product Development

Provide a means to share goals and reach them together

Goals shared can act as a powerful collective motivator. New accountability apps like FocusMate provide a service to connect two people, share goals up front on video and spend the next hour working towards them.

How can you being people together to share their goals and reach them together?

Conversion

Seed product launches with restricted gift access

If you have existing subscribers who have special access to something new that others don't, consider using this as an invitational gift to others. Both Dribbble and Clubhouse have done this well, limiting the number of people you yourself can share invites with.

Where can you build in a referral system that seeds new subscribers based on peoples' own networks?

Experience

Create positive, shareable peak-ends

Given that we're disproportionately sensitive and have a better recall of the peaks and ends of experiences, unexpected acts of kindness or positive moments are more likely to be shared on social media with friends.

Where can you add a positive ending that really taps in to a customer's own emotional aims, making them feel understood or special? These moments are gold and we'll share them with the world...

Connected to

Running workshops?

Reciprocity

is included in Box One of our physical workshop tool.
is included in Box Two of our physical workshop tool.
Box One