Priming

Our decisions are shaped by memories recalled from things just seen or heard

Images, words and even smells open up memory pathways that are then used as mental shortcuts, influencing any decision we then make.

Bargh, Chen & Burrows (1996). Automaticity of social behavior: Direct effects of trait construct and stereotype activation on action. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71(2), 230.

The study

Setup

34 people were split into 3 groups and each told to unscramble a list of either rude, polite or neutral words. After, they were told to see the researcher, who was engaged in a fake discussion with a peer. They were then timed with how long it took before they interrupted.

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Results

63% of those primed with rude words interrupted within 10 minutes, compared to only 18% of the polite group.

np_read_2490885_000000

Bargh, Chen & Burrows (1996). Automaticity of social behavior: Direct effects of trait construct and stereotype activation on action. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71(2), 230.

Key Takeaways

Prime with words that highlight the positive emotional effect of using your goods or services. For example, Spotify could prime users of its Discover Weekly playlist by using words that highlight its uniqueness or repeat gift-giving benefits.

Combine with images Coca Cola created an advert in Italy called ‘Open the happy can’ that primed potential buyers with a simple smile that was revealed upon opening. This was done in order to create an associative link between happiness and drink consumption, as well as providing a means of positive feedback for the consumer. 

 Keep it subtle. Prime too aggressively and the effect will weaken, or even lead to an unwanted Contrast Effect, where we’ll subconsciously reject and seek out opposites to the prime.

Priming

Our decisions are shaped by memories recalled from things just seen or heard

Images, words and even smells open up memory pathways that are then used as mental shortcuts, influencing any decision we then make.

Bargh, Chen & Burrows (1996). Automaticity of social behavior: Direct effects of trait construct and stereotype activation on action. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71(2), 230.

The study

Setup

34 people were split into 3 groups and each told to unscramble a list of either rude, polite or neutral words. After, they were told to see the researcher, who was engaged in a fake discussion with a peer. They were then timed with how long it took before they interrupted.

Results

63% of those primed with rude words interrupted within 10 minutes, compared to only 18% of the polite group.

Key Takeaways

Prime with words that highlight the positive emotional effect of using your goods or services. For example, Spotify could prime users of its Discover Weekly playlist by using words that highlight its uniqueness or repeat gift-giving benefits.

Combine with images Coca Cola created an advert in Italy called ‘Open the happy can’ that primed potential buyers with a simple smile that was revealed upon opening. This was done in order to create an associative link between happiness and drink consumption, as well as providing a means of positive feedback for the consumer. 

 Keep it subtle. Prime too aggressively and the effect will weaken, or even lead to an unwanted Contrast Effect, where we’ll subconsciously reject and seek out opposites to the prime.

Priming

Our decisions are shaped by memories recalled from things just seen or heard

Images, words and even smells open up memory pathways that are then used as mental shortcuts, influencing any decision we then make.

The study

Setup

34 people were split into 3 groups and each told to unscramble a list of either rude, polite or neutral words. After, they were told to see the researcher, who was engaged in a fake discussion with a peer. They were then timed with how long it took before they interrupted.

Results

63% of those primed with rude words interrupted within 10 minutes, compared to only 18% of the polite group.

np_read_2490885_000000

In detail

Pairings

Currently being prepared...

Related "Wilds"

Currently being sourced...

Connected to

Running workshops?

Priming

is included in Box One of our physical workshop tool.
is included in Box Two of our physical workshop tool.
Box One