Rewards

We change our behavior when given gifts that reinforce actions and goals

Rewards can have a powerful effect on behavior, increasing spending, loyalty and worker motivation. However, done wrong, they can also demotivate.

Phipps et al. (2015). Impact of a rewards-based incentive program on promoting fruit and vegetable purchases. American Journal of Public Health, vol. 105.

The study

Setup

58 households in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania had their fruit and veg shopping monitored for 8 weeks. Half were offered a 50% discount reward on all fruit and veg purchased and half were not.

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Results

Results showed that the reward increased healthy food purchasing behavior from 6.4 to 16.7 servings of fruit and veg  on average per week per household.

np_read_2490885_000000

Phipps et al. (2015). Impact of a rewards-based incentive program on promoting fruit and vegetable purchases. American Journal of Public Health, vol. 105.

Key Takeaways

Rewards come in two types: Extrinsic and Intrinsic

Extrinsic rewards are economic: pay, discounts, working conditions, gold stars, healthcare, promotions etc. 

Intrinsic rewards are emotional, coming from a sense of achievement through skill and hard work, unplanned verbal praise from authority figures, and peer recognition.

Too much extrinsic will lessen internal motivation as it’s seen as controlling, especially if they’re later removed (Murayama et al., 2010). Ensure that they’re significant enough to motivate against task boredom (Hidi, 2015) and are in line with the market needs of employees / customers.

Focus on rewarding intrinsically - seen as a superior reward (Deci et al., 1999) - with greater levels of trust, choice and freedom to make one’s own decisions. You’ll be rewarded with a more motivated, loyal following as a result.

Rewards

We change our behavior when given gifts that reinforce actions and goals

Rewards can have a powerful effect on behavior, increasing spending, loyalty and worker motivation. However, done wrong, they can also demotivate.

Phipps et al. (2015). Impact of a rewards-based incentive program on promoting fruit and vegetable purchases. American Journal of Public Health, vol. 105.

The study

Setup

58 households in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania had their fruit and veg shopping monitored for 8 weeks. Half were offered a 50% discount reward on all fruit and veg purchased and half were not.

Results

Results showed that the reward increased healthy food purchasing behavior from 6.4 to 16.7 servings of fruit and veg  on average per week per household.

Key Takeaways

Rewards come in two types: Extrinsic and Intrinsic

Extrinsic rewards are economic: pay, discounts, working conditions, gold stars, healthcare, promotions etc. 

Intrinsic rewards are emotional, coming from a sense of achievement through skill and hard work, unplanned verbal praise from authority figures, and peer recognition.

Too much extrinsic will lessen internal motivation as it’s seen as controlling, especially if they’re later removed (Murayama et al., 2010). Ensure that they’re significant enough to motivate against task boredom (Hidi, 2015) and are in line with the market needs of employees / customers.

Focus on rewarding intrinsically - seen as a superior reward (Deci et al., 1999) - with greater levels of trust, choice and freedom to make one’s own decisions. You’ll be rewarded with a more motivated, loyal following as a result.

Rewards

We change our behavior when given gifts that reinforce actions and goals

Rewards can have a powerful effect on behavior, increasing spending, loyalty and worker motivation. However, done wrong, they can also demotivate.

The study

Setup

58 households in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania had their fruit and veg shopping monitored for 8 weeks. Half were offered a 50% discount reward on all fruit and veg purchased and half were not.

Results

Results showed that the reward increased healthy food purchasing behavior from 6.4 to 16.7 servings of fruit and veg  on average per week per household.

np_read_2490885_000000

In detail

Connected to

Running workshops?

Rewards

is included in Box One of our physical workshop tool.
is included in Box Two of our physical workshop tool.
Box One