Product Development

Risk Aversion

We don’t like uncertainty and generally stick to what we know

Picture Superiority Effect

We remember images far better than words

Analysis Paralysis

Our capacity to process information and make decisions reduces with each made

IKEA Effect

We’ll pay disproportionately more for something we’ve helped create

Confirmation Bias

We look for information that supports our existing beliefs and ignore what doesn’t

Sunk Cost Bias

We’re unable to let go of our past bad investments, even if it makes sense to do so

Collection Bias

We have an emotional need to amass sets of related items

Goal Priming

When we’re reminded of our aims, we're more motivated to reach them

Availability Bias

Our judgements are heavily influenced by what comes to mind more easily

Product-Person Bias

We look for and value human connections in our products

Afterlife Effect

We recycle more when shown what the product will become

Pairings

Product Development

Avoid uncomfortable past associations

Surfacing the history of a repurposed product suits certain use cases over others. For instance, shoes recycled as underwear might not be as appealing as milk jugs remade into toys. It's important to balance concerns around product quality as well as feelings of potential disgust! What aspects of what you're recycling could trigger negative (albeit unfair) associations with what it becomes?

If unavoidable, how can you control for this with quality assurances and manufacturing processes?

Product Development

Provide opportunities to add the giver into the gift

Gifts are such personal gestures, but they could bring us even closer, by allowing the giver to express themselves more and become a larger part of the gift itself.

Currently, when we send gifts, we can sometimes create a personal note, but beyond that, there is little we can do.

High quality product companies should allow the giver more creative control of the gift, allowing them to choose from a variety of packaging options, scents, colours or custom-printed features that allow the giver to be better-represented within the gift, making them truly unique each time.

Digital product companies needn't lose out - offering the ability to let gift-givers record surprise audio or video messages that are unlocked by the receiver when they click the button in the email.

Gifts should celebrate the bond between two people, so we should design experiences that unlock and explore this natural yet powerful desire to connect, physically or digitally.

https://knackshops.com offers a great example of how to do it well.

Product Development

Offer a mix of constant and changing choices

In our product choices, we humans crave a complex mix of familiarity and newness. We know what we like, but we're also keen to seek out new experiences. Brands should embrace this, offering a small range of product choices that are either immovable, or variable.

UK eatery Honest Burgers do a great job here, providing a small number of always-on-the-menu burger options alongside other burgers that change by month or by store location.

Where can you provide this mix in the product choices you present to users? First, define what products or features should *never* change.

Second, how you can encourage curiosity and exploration with new ideas, driven by cross-brand collaboration, season or a new technology or ingredient, for instance?

Product Development

Use distinction to foster uniqueness

There are many ways to convey scarcity. If you have a range of products that are all similar in visual characteristics, consider exploring how a limited edition can feel especially valuable through the use of contrast. A rare black item amongst an otherwise white collection.

Where can you use contrast both dramatically and sparingly to harness its unique power?

Product Development

Create a one-of-a-kind product feeling

Allowing customers to tailor your product to their needs is central to feelings of meaningful ownership and long-term attachment to the brand.

However, if you allow for an IKEA effect in your product, how can you underline its uniqueness in your messaging? Letting customers know what is uniquely theirs and no-one else's will enrich the creative process further and heighten perceived value.

Product Development

Reduce unnecessary choice for unfamiliar new concepts

Too much choice can overwhelm, but a little choice allows companies to provide consistently for a range of differing tastes.

Where can you use choice to provide certainty and therefore familiarity?

Product Development

Risk Aversion

We don’t like uncertainty and generally stick to what we know

Picture Superiority Effect

We remember images far better than words

Analysis Paralysis

Our capacity to process information and make decisions reduces with each made

IKEA Effect

We’ll pay disproportionately more for something we’ve helped create

Confirmation Bias

We look for information that supports our existing beliefs and ignore what doesn’t

Sunk Cost Bias

We’re unable to let go of our past bad investments, even if it makes sense to do so

Collection Bias

We have an emotional need to amass sets of related items

Goal Priming

When we’re reminded of our aims, we're more motivated to reach them

Availability Bias

Our judgements are heavily influenced by what comes to mind more easily

Product-Person Bias

We look for and value human connections in our products

Afterlife Effect

We recycle more when shown what the product will become