Conversion

Scarcity

We value things more when they’re in limited supply

Social Proof

We copy the behaviors of others, especially in unfamiliar situations

Framing

We make very different decisions based on how a fact is presented

Limited Choice

We’re more likely to decide when the options are sensibly restricted

Loss Aversion

We feel more negative when losing something than positive when we gain it

Authority

We have a strong tendency to comply with those in charge

Default Effect

We tend to accept the option pre-chosen for us

Priming

Our decisions are shaped by memories recalled from things just seen or heard

Commitment

Once we’ve made a public statement, we make consistent decisions to support it

Zeigarnik Effect

Incomplete tasks weigh on our minds until done

Reactance

We’ll do the opposite from what we’re asked if we’re pushed too hard

Curiosity Effect

We're driven to seek missing info that closes our knowledge gap

Metaphorical Shortcut

New or complex ideas are easier understood through existing ones

Contrast Effect

We better remember products that stand out from their surroundings

Ownership Bias

We value things more when we feel we own them

Time Scarcity

We're more likely to act if the clock is ticking…

Foot In The Door

Making a small commitment now makes us more likely to agree to a greater one later

Fresh Start Effect

We're more likely to stick to habits made at the start of new time periods

Door In The Face

We're more likely to agree to a small request after first rejecting a larger one

Status Quo Bias

We tend to stick with our previous choices, even if the alternatives might be better

Mere Exposure Effect

We like things more as they become more familiar to us

Dynamic Norms

We’re more likely to change if we can see a new behavior developing

Competition

We strive with and against one another for limited resources and status

Odor Priming

We’ll pay more when we smell something nice

Serial Position Effect

We better remember the first and last items in a list

Salience

Our choices are determined by the information we're shown

If-Then Plans

If in this scenario, we then plan to do that, we'll more likely reach our goals

Pairings

Conversion

Offer multiple moments to reminisce past experiences

Whether you're selling a holiday, a training course or a fun day out, even when the experience has been and gone, we all seek out opportunities to recall the positive memories.

Travel companies can share nostalgic moments of past trips. For instance, if I'd booked a flight to Japan in Spring, it might be nice to send me a lovely reminder of the seasonal cherry blossom every 3 months after the trip. This would create positive recall and keep the travel brand front of mind, more deeply associating it with the experience. When it was time to book again for next year, the travel company would become the obvious choice to create brand new memories in Japan.

Similarly, a training company can create stronger knowledge recall by reminding trainees of what they'd learnt long after attending the training day, as well as triggering positive, nostalgic feelings for the event. Pithy, memorable or humourous mantras that were shared on the day could be easily repeated in marketing messaging, for instance.

Just because something ends, doesn't mean we need to let go of it. Moreover, great past experiences yearn to be segregated and repeated in our minds for a long time thereafter.

Conversion

Encourage action by offering closure on mystery

Make it easy for people to want to develop a curiosity in your products with playful, suggestive messaging regarding its outcomes.

Even reframing an initial call to action, like:

"Sign up to get started"

As something more curious and goal-orientated, like:

"Sign up to see how to do it"

...shows us that curiosity needn't be a grand event, but instead can operate in subtle, suggestive ways that playfully motivate by holding back certain information.

Where can you inspire explorative inquisition within people with in subtle ways at the beginning of their journey with you?

Conversion

Seed product launches with restricted gift access

If you have existing subscribers who have special access to something new that others don't, consider using this as an invitational gift to others. Both Dribbble and Clubhouse have done this well, limiting the number of people you yourself can share invites with.

Where can you build in a referral system that seeds new subscribers based on peoples' own networks?

Conversion

Boost list recall through contrast

In a given list of features, options or ideas, we tend to better recall the first and last. Make the most of this by creating visual distinction.

Where can you start with a bang...and end on one too?

Conversion

Let popularity guide your defaults

The behaviours of others greatly inform what we ourselves will do. Taking this a step further, when setting up default choices, use what is most popular as the default option to supercharge its effect. Communicate this clearly when presenting your options to reduce analysis paralysis and provide further choice confidence, especially for new customers.

What default options do you present, consciously or otherwise? How can you use the decisions of others to add a level of confidence to them?

Going further, if you wish to change your defaults, think about highlighting the social group that best helps reinforce this. For instance, a coffee shop defaulting to a new premium espresso that is already most popular amongst its online coffee bean subscribers.

Conversion

Guide through the new and unfamiliar with predefined choices

When we don’t know what to choose, we look for guidance. Defaults offer a great way to navigate the new.

Where can you guide people so that they can take action easily?

Conversion

Scarcity

We value things more when they’re in limited supply

Social Proof

We copy the behaviors of others, especially in unfamiliar situations

Framing

We make very different decisions based on how a fact is presented

Limited Choice

We’re more likely to decide when the options are sensibly restricted

Loss Aversion

We feel more negative when losing something than positive when we gain it

Authority

We have a strong tendency to comply with those in charge

Default Effect

We tend to accept the option pre-chosen for us

Priming

Our decisions are shaped by memories recalled from things just seen or heard

Commitment

Once we’ve made a public statement, we make consistent decisions to support it

Zeigarnik Effect

Incomplete tasks weigh on our minds until done

Reactance

We’ll do the opposite from what we’re asked if we’re pushed too hard

Curiosity Effect

We're driven to seek missing info that closes our knowledge gap

Metaphorical Shortcut

New or complex ideas are easier understood through existing ones

Contrast Effect

We better remember products that stand out from their surroundings

Ownership Bias

We value things more when we feel we own them

Time Scarcity

We're more likely to act if the clock is ticking…

Foot In The Door

Making a small commitment now makes us more likely to agree to a greater one later

Fresh Start Effect

We're more likely to stick to habits made at the start of new time periods

Door In The Face

We're more likely to agree to a small request after first rejecting a larger one

Status Quo Bias

We tend to stick with our previous choices, even if the alternatives might be better

Mere Exposure Effect

We like things more as they become more familiar to us

Dynamic Norms

We’re more likely to change if we can see a new behavior developing

Competition

We strive with and against one another for limited resources and status

Odor Priming

We’ll pay more when we smell something nice

Serial Position Effect

We better remember the first and last items in a list

Salience

Our choices are determined by the information we're shown

If-Then Plans

If in this scenario, we then plan to do that, we'll more likely reach our goals