Conversion

Scarcity

We value things more when they’re in limited supply

Social Proof

We copy the behaviors of others, especially in unfamiliar situations

Framing

We make very different decisions based on how a fact is presented

Limited Choice

We’re more likely to decide when the options are sensibly restricted

Loss Aversion

We feel more negative when losing something than positive when we gain it

Authority

We have a strong tendency to comply with those in charge

Default Effect

We tend to accept the option pre-chosen for us

Priming

Our decisions are shaped by memories recalled from things just seen or heard

Commitment

Once we’ve made a public statement, we make consistent decisions to support it

Zeigarnik Effect

Incomplete tasks weigh on our minds until done

Reactance

We’ll do the opposite from what we’re asked if we’re pushed too hard

Curiosity Effect

We're driven to seek missing info that closes our knowledge gap

Metaphorical Shortcut

New or complex ideas are easier understood through existing ones

Contrast Effect

We better remember products that stand out from their surroundings

Ownership Bias

We value things more when we feel we own them

Time Scarcity

We're more likely to act if the clock is ticking…

Foot In The Door

Making a small commitment now makes us more likely to agree to a greater one later

Fresh Start Effect

We're more likely to stick to habits made at the start of new time periods

Door In The Face

We're more likely to agree to a small request after first rejecting a larger one

Status Quo Bias

We tend to stick with our previous choices, even if the alternatives might be better

Mere Exposure Effect

We like things more as they become more familiar to us

Dynamic Norms

We’re more likely to change if we can see a new behavior developing

Competition

We strive with and against one another for limited resources and status

Odor Priming

We’ll pay more when we smell something nice

Serial Position Effect

We better remember the first and last items in a list

Pairings

Conversion

Overcome change aversion with increasing exposure over time

Sudden, unexpected change can feel difficult to stomach, particularly when large in size or experienced by customers most sensitive to change, whether in character or by industry.

If you're rolling out a significant change, consider using the Mere Exposure Effect to slowly introduce the new concept and reduce Risk Aversion. The first exposure to the change should be light and ask little of the recipient. e.g. A poster on the wall or a light reference in an email.

But over time, consider ways to slowly increase the level of information and also the level of involvement. A show and tell, Q&A or digital opportunity to explore what is new at one's own pace.

Crucially, this should be done over time, so requires planning. The bigger the change, the more potentially-disruptive, and so the longer the window you should be working within.

What large, strategic changes are you planning down the line?

How might you start planning for these now with a series of small 'change exposures' that can grow gently over time?

Conversion

Encourage action by offering closure on mystery

Make it easy for people to want to develop a curiosity in your products with playful, suggestive messaging regarding its outcomes.

Even reframing an initial call to action, like:

"Sign up to get started"

As something more curious and goal-orientated, like:

"Sign up to see how to do it"

...shows us that curiosity needn't be a grand event, but instead can operate in subtle, suggestive ways that playfully motivate by holding back certain information.

Where can you inspire explorative inquisition within people with in subtle ways at the beginning of their journey with you?

Conversion

Use distinct imagery to reduce info overload

Though words provide a great means to communicate, very quickly we can become cognitively-saturated and eventually overwhelmed or distracted.

Images, when well-presented, have the power to neatly sum up the meaning of an entire paragraph or chapter. We're hard-wired to look out for these visual cues, and better recall them over words.

Where can you provide visual imagery to help break up, summarise or support text-based information?

Conversion

Over-emphasise early progress to speed up task completion

Though we're more likely to complete tasks that we've had help getting started, we can do a better job of really emphasising that first step.

Whether it's by more clearly highlighting even the smallest of progressions (endowed or otherwise) on-screen, or by making the next step very easy to complete, where can you remind people that they're now well under way?

Conversion

Remind of the bigger goal when completing smaller tasks

Sometimes we can get lost in a long series of tasks and forget the ultimate aim of what we're trying to do. As a result, we may become demotivated and be less likely to complete the task.

However, being very clear and consistent about the aspirational outcomes that will be unlocked at the end will help remind people as to what's in it for them.

For instance, a pet insurance company that has a long form to fill in would do well to remind the user that they're "Only 5 minutes way from safety and comfort", supporting the message with an appropriate image.

What are the ultimate goals of your customers? How and where can you highlight these as they move though your processes? How can you make them feel great and help them imagine their exciting future in order to counterbalance any 'boring' steps they need to take now.

Conversion

Overcome fear of new, unknown choices with a little taster

We're creatures of habit, sticking to what we know even when there are better things available.

However, we can use a Foot In The Door to offer a low risk sample.

Where are people sticking to what they've done for a long time? This could be using an inferior product from a competitor, or an old product that you're looking to sunset.

What small thing could you provide them to take that first step into the unknown? A free 1hr webinar, a 3 month free trial for existing competitor customers, a free software migration process... The list is endless.

Most importantly, keep it small, easy, relevant and attractive.

Conversion

Scarcity

We value things more when they’re in limited supply

Social Proof

We copy the behaviors of others, especially in unfamiliar situations

Framing

We make very different decisions based on how a fact is presented

Limited Choice

We’re more likely to decide when the options are sensibly restricted

Loss Aversion

We feel more negative when losing something than positive when we gain it

Authority

We have a strong tendency to comply with those in charge

Default Effect

We tend to accept the option pre-chosen for us

Priming

Our decisions are shaped by memories recalled from things just seen or heard

Commitment

Once we’ve made a public statement, we make consistent decisions to support it

Zeigarnik Effect

Incomplete tasks weigh on our minds until done

Reactance

We’ll do the opposite from what we’re asked if we’re pushed too hard

Curiosity Effect

We're driven to seek missing info that closes our knowledge gap

Metaphorical Shortcut

New or complex ideas are easier understood through existing ones

Contrast Effect

We better remember products that stand out from their surroundings

Ownership Bias

We value things more when we feel we own them

Time Scarcity

We're more likely to act if the clock is ticking…

Foot In The Door

Making a small commitment now makes us more likely to agree to a greater one later

Fresh Start Effect

We're more likely to stick to habits made at the start of new time periods

Door In The Face

We're more likely to agree to a small request after first rejecting a larger one

Status Quo Bias

We tend to stick with our previous choices, even if the alternatives might be better

Mere Exposure Effect

We like things more as they become more familiar to us

Dynamic Norms

We’re more likely to change if we can see a new behavior developing

Competition

We strive with and against one another for limited resources and status

Odor Priming

We’ll pay more when we smell something nice

Serial Position Effect

We better remember the first and last items in a list