Donations
Inspired

Turning a 'should I?' into a 'which one?'

How Tate Modern makes donations quick, easy and of high value with an expertly-designed digital request box

We'd just been to see Yayoi Kusama's Infinity Mirror Rooms at the Tate Modern the other day, which, incidentally, is well worth the trip if you value hypnotic, almost haunting walk-in installations where the lights go on forever in every direction.

After being suitably disorientated and upon approaching the gallery's exit, I was struck by the following donation cabinet.

It was a bold declaration, from the messaging, to the choice architecture, worthy of sharing with you here.

Autonomy

The first thing that strikes you with its design is the confident use of autonomy, allowing you to choose between two distinct amounts, instead of one, or something more undefined.

Merely giving people a clear choice allows them to both express their preferences and feel a sense of control over the situation. Importantly, it also changes the nature of the donation conversation from "should I?" to "which should I?".

Defaults

Of course, you can put in as little or as much as you wish, subject to having cash on hand. However, the digital Default options set here are pretty bold and salient; the simple, direct messaging combined with the two illuminated contactless payment devices and icon act as a pretty strong reference of what the 'right' decision looks like here.

Anchoring

And talking of values, for the only two options available for most cashless consumers, £5 and £10 are not particularly small amounts either.

Setting such high anchors is a way of inferring otherwise hidden value in the experience, especially for those who visit the museum for free.

If low anchors had been set of, say £1 and £2, Tate may receive more digital donations, but the perceived experience would also be set at that value, which could damage both the gallery's and artists' brands and also expectations of future ticket prices, shop merchandise and so on. In terms of the impact on cash donations, you'd probably also see a lot more coins going in than notes.

Other design features to highlight include the use of a slot designed for notes only and not coins, inferring a lower end to donation levels, along with the strategic, physical locations of the boxes themselves, positioned close to the exit at the point of peak-end reciprocity.

Closing thoughts

One might wonder how, whilst maintaining the simplicity, Tate could do more with the messaging, tailoring it more around reciprocity, e.g. "Help support Tate. Please donate £5 or £10" or "Did you enjoy yourself? If so, please donate £5 or £10".

The donation request messaging could also be spaced out across the experience, with a notice in a free exhibition saying "If you're enjoying yourself, please donate at the exit".

The digital donation experience could also be improved itself with a moment of delightful visual feedback that occurs once contactless payment is successful, particularly for the higher amount.

Regardless of any changes, this is a great, powerful example of behavioural design that makes donation decisions both effortless and clear whilst protecting the value of a brand with a lot of cultural capital that's otherwise hard to quantify.

One might say it is a work of art itself, at least for the behaviourally-inclined.

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows y

ou to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Donations
Inspired

Turning a 'should I?' into a 'which one?'

How Tate Modern makes donations quick, easy and of high value with an expertly-designed digital request box

We'd just been to see Yayoi Kusama's Infinity Mirror Rooms at the Tate Modern the other day, which, incidentally, is well worth the trip if you value hypnotic, almost haunting walk-in installations where the lights go on forever in every direction.

After being suitably disorientated and upon approaching the gallery's exit, I was struck by the following donation cabinet.

It was a bold declaration, from the messaging, to the choice architecture, worthy of sharing with you here.

Autonomy

The first thing that strikes you with its design is the confident use of autonomy, allowing you to choose between two distinct amounts, instead of one, or something more undefined.

Merely giving people a clear choice allows them to both express their preferences and feel a sense of control over the situation. Importantly, it also changes the nature of the donation conversation from "should I?" to "which should I?".

Defaults

Of course, you can put in as little or as much as you wish, subject to having cash on hand. However, the digital Default options set here are pretty bold and salient; the simple, direct messaging combined with the two illuminated contactless payment devices and icon act as a pretty strong reference of what the 'right' decision looks like here.

Anchoring

And talking of values, for the only two options available for most cashless consumers, £5 and £10 are not particularly small amounts either.

Setting such high anchors is a way of inferring otherwise hidden value in the experience, especially for those who visit the museum for free.

If low anchors had been set of, say £1 and £2, Tate may receive more digital donations, but the perceived experience would also be set at that value, which could damage both the gallery's and artists' brands and also expectations of future ticket prices, shop merchandise and so on. In terms of the impact on cash donations, you'd probably also see a lot more coins going in than notes.

Other design features to highlight include the use of a slot designed for notes only and not coins, inferring a lower end to donation levels, along with the strategic, physical locations of the boxes themselves, positioned close to the exit at the point of peak-end reciprocity.

Closing thoughts

One might wonder how, whilst maintaining the simplicity, Tate could do more with the messaging, tailoring it more around reciprocity, e.g. "Help support Tate. Please donate £5 or £10" or "Did you enjoy yourself? If so, please donate £5 or £10".

The donation request messaging could also be spaced out across the experience, with a notice in a free exhibition saying "If you're enjoying yourself, please donate at the exit".

The digital donation experience could also be improved itself with a moment of delightful visual feedback that occurs once contactless payment is successful, particularly for the higher amount.

Regardless of any changes, this is a great, powerful example of behavioural design that makes donation decisions both effortless and clear whilst protecting the value of a brand with a lot of cultural capital that's otherwise hard to quantify.

One might say it is a work of art itself, at least for the behaviourally-inclined.

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows y

ou to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Donations
Inspired

Turning a 'should I?' into a 'which one?'

How Tate Modern makes donations quick, easy and of high value with an expertly-designed digital request box

We'd just been to see Yayoi Kusama's Infinity Mirror Rooms at the Tate Modern the other day, which, incidentally, is well worth the trip if you value hypnotic, almost haunting walk-in installations where the lights go on forever in every direction.

After being suitably disorientated and upon approaching the gallery's exit, I was struck by the following donation cabinet.

It was a bold declaration, from the messaging, to the choice architecture, worthy of sharing with you here.

Autonomy

The first thing that strikes you with its design is the confident use of autonomy, allowing you to choose between two distinct amounts, instead of one, or something more undefined.

Merely giving people a clear choice allows them to both express their preferences and feel a sense of control over the situation. Importantly, it also changes the nature of the donation conversation from "should I?" to "which should I?".

Defaults

Of course, you can put in as little or as much as you wish, subject to having cash on hand. However, the digital Default options set here are pretty bold and salient; the simple, direct messaging combined with the two illuminated contactless payment devices and icon act as a pretty strong reference of what the 'right' decision looks like here.

Anchoring

And talking of values, for the only two options available for most cashless consumers, £5 and £10 are not particularly small amounts either.

Setting such high anchors is a way of inferring otherwise hidden value in the experience, especially for those who visit the museum for free.

If low anchors had been set of, say £1 and £2, Tate may receive more digital donations, but the perceived experience would also be set at that value, which could damage both the gallery's and artists' brands and also expectations of future ticket prices, shop merchandise and so on. In terms of the impact on cash donations, you'd probably also see a lot more coins going in than notes.

Other design features to highlight include the use of a slot designed for notes only and not coins, inferring a lower end to donation levels, along with the strategic, physical locations of the boxes themselves, positioned close to the exit at the point of peak-end reciprocity.

Closing thoughts

One might wonder how, whilst maintaining the simplicity, Tate could do more with the messaging, tailoring it more around reciprocity, e.g. "Help support Tate. Please donate £5 or £10" or "Did you enjoy yourself? If so, please donate £5 or £10".

The donation request messaging could also be spaced out across the experience, with a notice in a free exhibition saying "If you're enjoying yourself, please donate at the exit".

The digital donation experience could also be improved itself with a moment of delightful visual feedback that occurs once contactless payment is successful, particularly for the higher amount.

Regardless of any changes, this is a great, powerful example of behavioural design that makes donation decisions both effortless and clear whilst protecting the value of a brand with a lot of cultural capital that's otherwise hard to quantify.

One might say it is a work of art itself, at least for the behaviourally-inclined.

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows y

ou to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

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